Window Purchasing Tips

FAS Windows & Doors has put together a checklist of questions that must be taken into consideration to ensure that you protect yourself and your home when it comes to choosing the right company to replace your windows.

Click on each question below to read more.

Question Checklist:

Do I need to have a permit pulled for my windows?

A permit must be pulled, it’s the law.
Permits are required by municipalities to ensure the products you choose will meet all state requirements on wind ratings and installation requirements. Yes, there are specific guidelines on how windows and doors are to be installed in the state of Florida. This process is guided by the manufacturer specifications.

The permitting process guarantees that the work FAS Windows & Doors performs will be double checked by the county and meets the strict Florida Building Codes. Pulling a permit also protects you from a product being installed in your home that does not meet code.

By not pulling a permit you will have no protection and run the risk of having to replace the windows and doors at your own expense.

Do your windows meet the DP Rating & Hurricane Protection requirement?

Design Pressure Ratings

Prior to starting the process of replacing your windows, you may have never heard of window design pressure ratings. However, now you know that your new windows need to meet a certain design pressure (DP) requirement depending on your location.

What is Design Pressure (DP)?

As defined by the AAMA (American Architectural Manufacturers Association), WDMA (Window and Door Manufacturers Association), and the NFRC (National Fenestration Rating Council), design pressure is a rating that identifies the load – induced by wind and/or static snow – that a product is rated to withstand in its end-use application.

In most area’s the minimum requirement by Florida State code is a design pressure of 35 and as high as 60 in High Velocity Hurricane Zones (HVHZ).

This is the most abused code requirement in Florida.

How do you know what the proper DP rating should be?

A number of things are taken into consideration when the design pressure ratings are calculated, including geographic location, the height of the building and the location of that window in the building.

A home in Orlando, for example, may have a design pressure requirement of 35 because it’s in the center of the state, but a home in Miami could have a DP. With winds and potential hurricanes, the geographic location of the coastal homes requires a stronger DP.

Your local building department can assist you in determining what DP rating you need, based on the location and design of your home. Most municipalities have maps or easy-to-read charts that clearly explain the requirements you will need to meet in order to effectively protect your home with the proper Design Pressure.

If you’re working with a reputable, licensed and insured window installation company like FAS Windows & Doors, they should be able to help find the manufacturer specifications and verify the proper DR ratings.

FAS Windows & Doors has a three-step process to ensure the products you choose will meet the strict DP requirements:

1. Sales representatives carry laptops and use manufacturer specifications to verify proper DP ratings.

2. FAS Windows & Doors has a purchasing department to process all orders and double check the DP ratings by municipality per code requirement before ordering the desired product.

3. FAS Windows & Doors will pull a permit on
all jobs.

There is a final check by the county before the permit is issued and verification that the correct products will be installed.

If a permit were not pulled, the homeowner would run the risk of getting caught and having to replace the products with products that meet code at their own expense.

Have more questions about DP ratings and permits?

Our team is here to answer any questions you may have. Visit our Tampa or Orlando showroom, or call today to schedule a free, no-obligation home consultation.

Do you offer wholesale pricing for windows and doors?

Anatomy of a Window

Jambs: The window frame members which compose the top, sides and bottom (sill) of a unit.

Glazing: The glass panes or lights in the sash of a window. Also the act of installing lights of glass in a window sash.

Grille: Ornamental or simulated muntins and bars which don’t actually divide the lights of glass. They fit on the inside of the sash against the glass surface for easy removal. They can also be secured to the exterior of the sash.

Side Jamb: The window frame members which compose the top, sides and bottom (sill) of a unit.

Sill:
Horizontal member that forms the bottom of a window frame.

Lower Sash: The framework holding a glass in the window unit. Composed of stiles (sides) and rails (top and bottom)

Upper Sash: The framework holding a glass in the window unit. Composed of stiles (sides) and rails (top and bottom).

Frame: Outside member of window unit which encloses the sash, composed of side jambs, head jamb and sill.

Cladding: A material secured to exterior or interior faces creating a more durable, low-maintenance surface.Weatherstripping: Metal, plastic or felt strips designed to seal between a window sash and frame or stops to prevent air and water leakage.

Exterior Jamb Groove: Flat wood parts which are fastened to the inside edges of the window jamb to extend it in width and adapt to a thicker wall. The inside edge of extension jambs should be flush with the finished wall surface: the inside casing is then secured to it.

Insulating Glass: A combination of two or more panes of glass with hermetically sealed air space between them. This space may or may not be filled with an inert gas. Insulating glass with a special low emissions coating to restrict the flow of the radiant heat is called Low-E insulating glass.

Are you Better Business Bureau accredited?

Better Business Bureau Accreditation

Make sure you check out the companies you are considering.

The BBB has been around a long time and is there for you. If a company is not trustworthy and regularly does not fulfill their promises, you can be guaranteed they will not be a member of the BBB.

Go ahead, check us out.

(Click on the logos to go directly to our profiles)

Central Florida

West Florida

Do you have a service department and warehouse facilities?

Check, Check and Check again that the company you are considering can fulfill the warranty obligations from the manufacturer.

Do they have a real place of business and not working out of the back of their truck?

FAS Windows & Doors has full time service tech’s on duty at all times managed by a full time Service Manger who’s sole job responsibility is to take care of our valued customers and fulfill our promises.

FAS Windows & Doors stocks parts and supplies from all manufacturers we represent. This helps to expedite when a service issue arises. Security issues such as broken windows or locks will always be addressed first.

We also have a commencement policy that states once we start a job, we stay on that job until it is finished. FAS Windows & Doors will not pull a crew off a job to go do a service somewhere else. This ensures a timely installation.

Does you ensure a waiver of lien once the project is complete?

Anatomy of a Window

Jambs: The window frame members which compose the top, sides and bottom (sill) of a unit.

Glazing: The glass panes or lights in the sash of a window. Also the act of installing lights of glass in a window sash.

Grille: Ornamental or simulated muntins and bars which don’t actually divide the lights of glass. They fit on the inside of the sash against the glass surface for easy removal. They can also be secured to the exterior of the sash.

Side Jamb: The window frame members which compose the top, sides and bottom (sill) of a unit.

Sill:
Horizontal member that forms the bottom of a window frame.

Lower Sash: The framework holding a glass in the window unit. Composed of stiles (sides) and rails (top and bottom)

Upper Sash: The framework holding a glass in the window unit. Composed of stiles (sides) and rails (top and bottom).

Frame: Outside member of window unit which encloses the sash, composed of side jambs, head jamb and sill.

Cladding: A material secured to exterior or interior faces creating a more durable, low-maintenance surface.Weatherstripping: Metal, plastic or felt strips designed to seal between a window sash and frame or stops to prevent air and water leakage.

Exterior Jamb Groove: Flat wood parts which are fastened to the inside edges of the window jamb to extend it in width and adapt to a thicker wall. The inside edge of extension jambs should be flush with the finished wall surface: the inside casing is then secured to it.

Insulating Glass: A combination of two or more panes of glass with hermetically sealed air space between them. This space may or may not be filled with an inert gas. Insulating glass with a special low emissions coating to restrict the flow of the radiant heat is called Low-E insulating glass.

Do you have Liability Insurance, a General Contractors License, Worker's Comp, and Property Damage Coverage?

FAS Windows & Doors carries multiple categories of insurance for your protection.

Once again, demand to see the Certificate of Liability Insurance

There is too much at risk to do business with someone who is trying to save money by eliminating insurance.

“When it comes to your home there is much more to consider than just the price. The pain of a poor decision is remembered long after the price is forgotten.”  

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